Archive for the ‘1/6000 Battles’ Category

WWI Naval Battle – Kattegat, November 1914

November 19, 2014

This is the second in a series of hypothetical battles based on the implementation of the strategy suggested by Wolfgang Wegener (“The Naval Strategy of the World War“). For a brief description of the Wegener Thesis, see this article.

After taking the Jutland peninsula, the Germans establish a naval base at Frederikshavn. The British send the battle cruisers remaining operational from the previous battle and a supporting battle squadron into the Kattegat to disrupt German mining efforts.

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility 21,000 yards. Wind westerly at 8 knots. Seastate 2.

Status at the end of the game: Kat-status

Damage output file: Kat-output

Plot of ship movements: Kat-plot

Map: Kattegat – Skagen 10NM Grid

 

WWI Naval Battle – Aarhus Bugt, November 1914

November 12, 2014

This is the first of a series of hypothetical battles based on the implementation of the strategy suggested by Wolfgang Wegener (“The Naval Strategy of the World War“).

Having failed to defeat France in the campaign of 1914, the Germans invade Denmark as the first step to achieving a geographical position from which a naval war against Britain can be waged. To support the advance of the army north through the Jutland peninsula, the pre-dreadnought squadrons sortie from Kiel to bombard the southern defenses of Aarhus. British intelligence intercepts allow them to send the battle cruiser squadrons into the Kattegat in response.

After 50 minutes of maneuvering, the British established a favorable position to leeward blocking the German retreat. We called the game at that point since it was getting late. We expected many German ships to be destroyed, unless the British lost battlecruisers to magazine explosions. In any case, the German army would get no naval support at Aarhus.

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility 11,000 yards. Wind westerly at 14 knots. Seastate 3.

Status at the end of the game: Aarhus-status

Damage output file: Aarhus-output

Plot of ship movements: Aarhus-plot

Map: Aarhus 10NM grid

WWI Naval Battle – Strait of Messina 1914

October 30, 2014

In this hypothetical battle, The German Mediterranean squadron (significantly enlarged from the historical one) is cornered by the British in August 1914.

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility 20,000 yards. Wind westerly at 10 knots. Seastate 2.

Status at the end of the game: Messina Status

Damage output file: Messina-output

Plot of ship movements: Messina-plot

The German squadron heads east out of the Strait of Messina after coaling. Two British battlecruisers pass through the straits and approach from the northwest. Milne, in his flagship Inflexible, approaches from the southeast. The armoured cruisers of the 1st Cruiser Squadron approach from the northeast. The Goeben and the British battlecruisers are limited to 24 knots due to maintenance issues.

The Inflexible is sunk by the Goeben, allowing her to escape to the south with little damage. The German cruisers are all sunk and the British also lose one armoured cruiser.

Milne is posthumously hailed as a hero, and the Goeben reaches Turkey to play her historical role there.

WWI Naval Battle – Pola

September 17, 2014

In this hypothetical battle, The French attack the Austro-Hungarian naval base of Pola (Pula in Croatia today) in September 1914.

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility 22,000 yards. Wind southeasterly at 10 knots. Seastate 2.

Status at the end of the game: Pola-status

Damage output file: Pola-output

Plot of ship movements: Pola plot

This scenario was not balanced well due to the French advantage in gun range and the slow speed of the oldest A-H ships.

WWI Naval Battle – Interception of the HSF

September 10, 2014

As a counterpart to a recent hypothetical battle where the German battlecruisers were sent into the channel to intercept the BEF transports, this scenario assumes the High Seas Fleet demonstrates in the North Sea to draw the Grand Fleet away from the channel. The GF intercepts the HSF as it moves south along the Danish coast toward the Jade.

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility 14,000 yards. Wind northwesterly at 12 knots. Seastate 2.

Status at the end of the game: BEF2-status

Damage output file: BEF2-output

Plots of ship movements:

first 40 minutes BEF2-plot-1to40

last 50 minutes BEF2-plot-40to90

total BEF2-plot

At the point where we stopped, both battle fleets had taken significant damage and it was expected that a lot more ships would soon be sunk.

WWI Naval Battle – Return of von Spee

August 27, 2014

The German Asiatic and Mediterranean squadrons are attempting to return to Germany in September of 1914. Scouting Group I has evaded the British in order to escort them back. While coaling in Faxa Bay Iceland, they are caught by the Battlecruiser Fleet.

German light cruisers were required to stay stationary for the first three turns (15 minutes) and were limited to an ordered speed of 10 knots on turn 4. German heavy ships were required to stay stationary for the first four turns and were limited to an ordered speed of 5 knots on turn 5 and 10 knots on turn 6. The Goben and the three battlecruisers of the 2nd BCS were limited to 22 knots due to maintenance issues.

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility 22,000 yards. Wind northeasterly at 25 knots. Seastate 3.

Status at the end of the game: RvS status

Damage output file: RvS output

Plot: RvS plot

 

The game was stopped at this point due to the time and to avoid the long gunnery duel which would have followed.

WWI Naval Battle – Skagerrak, July 1914

July 10, 2014

After the battle in the Fehmarn Belt, the surviving British ships passed through the Kattegat to the Skagerrak. There they were met by the other division of the 2nd Battle Squadron (four Orion class dreadnoughts) and the battlecruiser New Zealand (assigned to the 1st BCS at this time). This force was then intercepted by German ships from Wilhelmshaven.

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility 16,000 yards. Wind northerly at 16 knots. Seastate 3.

Status at the end of the game: belt4 IO

Damage output file: Belt4 output

Plot: belt4plot

 

WWI Naval Battle – Fehmarn Belt, July 1914

June 11, 2014

In June 1914, units of the British fleet were in the Baltic Sea. A division of the 2nd Battle Squadron (four King George V class dreadnoughts) commanded by Vice Admiral Sir George Warrender and three light cruisers were in Kiel, Germany between June 23rd and June 30th. The 1st Battlecruiser Squadron commanded by Rear Admiral Sir David Beatty visited Riga, Revel and Kronstadt, and was in Kronstadt on the 28th when the assassination of Austrian Archduke Ferdinand occurred.

This hypothetical engagement assumes (1) that the Austrian government promptly responded to the assassination with a declaration of war on Serbia, (2) that a state of war existed between Britain and Germany on July 1st, and (3) that the Germans sortied their available ships to intercept the British squadrons before they could exit the Baltic.

The composition of the German force is extrapolated from the ships mentioned in von Hase’s description of the Kiel visit. British light cruisers are assumed to have also accompanied the 1st BCS.

After leaving Kiel, Warrender cruises in the Fehmarn Belt waiting for Beatty to arrive from the east. The 1st BCS leaves Kronstadt on the 29th in order to reach the Fehmarn Belt on July 1st. Beatty is still a Rear Admiral at this point and Warrender will be in overall command when the two forces join.

References:

George M. Nekrasov, “Expendable Glory: Russian Battleship in the Baltic, 1915-1917” [for the presence of the 1st BCS at Kronstadt on July 28th]

Commander Georg von Hase, “Kiel & Jutland” [for details of the Kiel visit and the ships present]

 

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility 16,000 yards. Wind northwesterly at 14 knots. Seastate 2.

Status at the end of the game: Final status belt3

Damage output file: Belt3 output

Plot: belt3-plot

 

WWI Naval Battle – North Sea December 1916

June 4, 2014

In this hypothetical engagement, the newest units of the Grand Fleet and High Seas Fleet duel in the North Sea.

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility 20,000 yards. Wind northeasterly at 14 knots. Seastate 3.

Status at the end of the game: NS16L final summary

Damage output file: NS16L output

Plot: NS16L plot

The game was ended at this point due to time. A few additional turns were played on the computer. The German dreadnoughts avoided the torpedo attack, although two light cruisers were hit.

Extended output file: NS16L extended

WWI Naval Battle – Gulf of Finland May 1915

May 15, 2014

In this hypothetical engagement, the Germans send a portion of the High Seas Fleet into the Gulf of Finland in an attempt to engage and destroy the Russian Baltic Fleet.

Scale: 1/6000 miniatures, 500 yards/in ground scale.

Rules: Computer code in development.

Visibility was 18,000 yards. Wind was southerly at 8 knots and the seastate was 2.

Status at the end of the game: Finland End Status

Damage output summary (special damage only – flotation hits not listed): Finland short output

Plots: Finland plot 1  Finland plot 2a

 

With one pre-dreadnought sunk and several large ships heavily damaged, the Russians give up the game.