Archive for the ‘1/6000 Battles’ Category

WW1 Naval – Oran 1914

December 2, 2018

This alternate history scenario was a confrontation between British and French ships in November 1914. The British were tasked with preventing the return of the French fleet from Oran to Toulon. The French were to get underway from the anchorage at Oran and get past the British.

Player briefings

Status at the end of the game

Narrative

Player reports:
British
French

Plots of ship movements:
0-30 minutes
30-45 minutes
40-60 minutes
All

Computer code (described here)

We stopped play after 12 turns (60 minutes of game time) and about 4 hours of real time.

Heligoland Bight – 1916

November 2, 2018

This Friday we played a fictitious naval battle set in the North Sea in 1916. The British attempt to sweep the Heligoland Bight to eliminate German patrols. The Germans are supporting their light forces with heavy ships. The scenario includes ships not actually available in the North Sea at the time.

Player briefings

Winds WSW at 3 knots. Sea state 2. Visibility 5 NM toward the SW, 6 NM toward the NE.

Status at the end of the game

Narrative

Player reports:
British
German

Plots of ship movements:
0-30 minutes
30-50 minutes
All

Computer code (described here)

We played for about 4 hours without a decisive result. The British had suffered somewhat more damage. In spite of a lot of torpedo fire from the light cruisers and destroyers, the only two torpedo hits were achieved by the Von der Tann and the Blucher.

Seekrieg 5 – Tsushima

May 26, 2018

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a Russo-Japanese War naval game using the Seekrieg 5 rules. The scenario included battleships from the Battle of Tsushima.

The battle was fought in calm seas and hazy weather, visibility 12,000 yards. The lead ships started about 12,000 yards apart.

Japanese ships in a single line ahead:
Mikasa, Asahi, Fuji, Shikishima, Chin Yen

Russian ships in two divisions, each in line ahead:
Kniaz Suvarov, Imperator Alexander III, Borodino, Orel
Oslyabya, Sissoi Veliki, Navarin, Imperator Nicolai I

Crew quality was randomized, with the Japanese having a probable advantage:

Japanese:
1-20%       +1
21-80%    +2
81-100%  +3

Russian:
1-30%        -1
31-90%       0
91-100%   +1

The battle opened with the Borodino class ships firing at the four new Japanese battleships, the Oslyabya firing at the Chin Yen and the four Japanese battleships firing on the lead pair of each Russian division. The guns of the remaining ships would be out of range for several turns. The Japanese soon switched to firing their primary guns on the four Borodino class and their secondary guns on the older Russian ships. The Imperator Alexander III lost an engine room on the first turn, forcing her to leave the formation. That was the story for the rest of the battle, with the Russian first division taking most of the damage.

After 14 turns and more than four hours of real time, the damage was:

Russian:
Kniaz Suvarov                      3 tiers, speed reduced to 7 knots
Imperator Alexander III    1 tier, speed reduced to 9 knots
Borodino                               light damage
Orel                                        8 tiers, speed reduced to 11 knots,
–                                               no main battery, sinking
Oslyabya                               light damage
Sissoi Veliki                          light damage
Navarin                                  light damage
Imperator Nicolai I             light damage

Japanese:
Mikasa                                    light damage
Asahi                                       light damage
Fuji                                           light damage
Shikishima                             1 tier, speed reduced to 8 knots
Chin Yen                                 1 tier

 

 

Risikoflotte Risked – 1914 Naval AAR

May 5, 2018

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a fictitious naval battle set in the North Sea in May 1914. The British attempt to destroy the German fleet in the North Sea bases. The German fleet sails to fight in the Heligoland Bight. The scenario is based on the British strategy of destroying fleets which may become a threat (Copenhagen) (also), and the German concept of the Risikoflotte (risk fleet).

Player briefings: Copenhagen 1914

Visibility 14,000 yards, improving gradually. Wind westerly at 8 knots. Sea state 3.

Status at the end of the game: Cope IO

Damage output file: Cope Short output

Player reports:
Cope British
Cope German

Plots of ship movements:
0-30 minutes Cope plot 0-30
30-50 minutes Cope plot 30-50
50-60 minutes Cope plot 50-60
All Cope plot all

Computer code (described here)

After more than four hours of play and 60 minutes of game time we called it a day. 5 British dreadnoughts were sunk and 2 were in a sinking condition. 2 German dreadnoughts were sunk and 1 was heavily damaged. The Germans could claim a tactical victory at this point but not a strategic victory.

This battle was played some years ago with an earlier version of the code.

RJW Naval – Skagerrak 1905

March 24, 2018

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a fictitious naval battle set in the North Sea during the Russo-Japanese War.

The Russo-Japanese War has been in progress since 1904. Historically, the Franco-Russian Alliance of 1894 did not require France to support Russia since no Triple Alliance member state was involved. The Anglo-Japanese Alliance of 1902 did not require Britain to support Japan since Japan was not at war with more than one state.

In this somewhat altered history, Germany has decided to spend money on the army and not build a large fleet. Anglo-German relations are good. France finds it necessary to support Russia due to the military balance in Europe. Japan, assuming that this is the case, attacks French assets in Asia. Thus France and Russia are at war with Japan and the Anglo-Japanese Alliance (Article 3) is invoked.

Player briefings: Skagerrak 1905 Briefing

Visibility 18,000 yards. Wind westerly at 14 knots. Sea state 3.

Status at the end of the game: sk1905 IO

Damage output file: sk1905 output

Player reports:
sk1905 side 1
sk1905 side 2

Plots of ship movements:
0-40 minutes sk-plot-0-40
40-70 minutes sk-plot-40-70
All sk-plot-all

Computer code (described here)

The British concentrated their fire on the Russian ships and damaged all four of the Borodino class (the most valuable Russian ships). The French placed themselves between the British and the Russians. The Russians fought on, declining to leave the French to fight alone against a much larger British force. After about 3.5 hours of play and 70 minutes of game time, many of the heavy ships were low on ammunition. A minor British win perhaps, but all sides acquitted themselves well.

WW1 Naval – Brindisi 1915

February 10, 2018

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a fictitious naval battle set in the Adriatic in WW1. On June 15, 1915, a few weeks after the Italian declaration of war on Austria-Hungary, the Austro-Hungarian fleet sails to attack Brindisi and to lure out the Italian fleet. The Italians are alerted and hope to avenge Lissa.

Visibility 14,000 yards. Wind WSW at 10 knots. Seastate 2.

Status at the end of the game: Brin IO

Damage output file: Brin output report

Player reports:
Brin Italian reports
Brin A-H reports

Plots of ship movements:
0-20 minutes brin-plot 0-20
20-45 minutes brin-plot 20-45
All brin-plot

Computer code (described here)

After four hours of play we ended the game with the Austro-Hungarians having lost 2 battleships and all their destroyers and the Italians having lost most of their destroyers. Several cruisers on both sides were badly shot up.

 

Tsushima – Russo-Japanese War Naval AAR

May 13, 2017

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a Russo-Japanese War naval battle based on the Battle of Tsushima. In order to make the game more balanced, the Russian ships were not handicapped to reflect their historical performance.

Visibility 14,000 yards. Wind SW at 14 knots. Seastate 3

Status at the end of the game: tsus2 io

Damage output file: tsus2 out

Plot of ship movements:
0 to 30 minutes tsus2 plot 0-30
30 to 60 minutes tsus2 plot 30-60
60 to 90 minutes tsus2 plot 60-90

Computer code (described here)

We called the game after about 4.5 hours of play (90 minutes of game time). The damage was fairly even at that point. The Russian battleships were low on main gun ammunition and several were completely out, so their ability to continue the fight was limited.

Bay of Algiers, 1914, Again

April 15, 2017

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a WWI naval game using a modified version of a scenario tested previously.

This fleet action is based on the Triple Alliance naval convention of 1913, as described in “The Great War at Sea” by Sondhaus. The plan was for the Italian and Austro-Hungarian fleets and any German ships in the Mediterranean to engage the French Fleet and block the Algerian troop transports. This scenario assumes that the war starts in February 1914, and that the British Mediterranean squadron joins the French.

The confrontation occurs north of the Bay of Algiers.

Visibility 18,000 yards. Wind NNW at 3 knots. Seastate 1

Status at the end of the game: alg2 io

Damage output file: alg2-output

Plot of ship movements:
0 to 20 minutes alg plot 0-20
20 to 40 minutes alg plot 20-40
40 to 55 minutes alg plot 40-55
55 to 70 minutes alg plot 55-70
full plot alg plot all

Computer code (described here)

The French had more undamaged ships when we quit, so the troop transports should be safe.

WW1 Naval – Churchill’s Idea

January 28, 2017

This weekend the local HMGS-South group played a World War One naval game based on this March 9th 1915 memo (item 121 Jellicoe Papers) from the 1st Lord of the Admiralty. The idea was to send a fast division into the Baltic Sea and, in cooperation with the Russian fleet, blockade German ports. The Germans send the ships that were in the Baltic for training exercises.

The confrontation occurs off Aarhus, Denmark: aarhus-10nm-grid

Status at the end of the game: io

Damage output file: chur-output

Plot of ship movements:
First 25 minutes: chur-plot-1-25
Last 25 minutes: chur-plot-25-50
Entire plot: chur-plot

Computer code (described here)

Coronel and the Falklands

October 19, 2016

The book “Fatal Choices, Wargames, Decisions and Destiny in the 1914 Battles of Coronel and Falklands” by Seth Owen includes historical and non-historical wargame scenarios associated with the cruise of the German East Asia Squadron. Several of these were played as solo exercises using this computer code. The code is not intended for small scale actions. The main drawback in using it is that orders can only be changed every 5 minutes. Using the options for automatic target selection and opening fire mitigates this to some extent.

The Battle of Cocos

The fight between the Sydney and the Emden. The damage the Sydney sustained seems to be more than in the actual battle.

Status at the end of the game: cocos-io-10-10

Damage output file: cocos-output

Plot of ship movements: cocos-plot-10-10

The Battle of Samoa

A hypothetical battle between an Australian squadron including the battlecruiser Australia and von Spee’s squadron. The Australia takes significant damage. The Gneisenau runs out of 21 cm shells (her primary battery), in part because while the Australia was firing at Scharnhorst, Gneisenau could keep up a higher rate of fire. According to the NAVWEAPS site, the Scharnhorst class had 87.5 rounds per 21 cm gun.

Status at the end of the game: samoa-io

Damage output file: samoa-output

Plot of ship movements: samoa-plot

The Battle of Coronel

The historical battle between Cradock’s squadron and von Spee’s squadron. The Scharnhorst runs out of 21 cm shells and the Gneisenau nearly runs out. This may be because the range was generally longer than in the actual battle, or because the penalties on rate of fire for poor visibility are not severe enough.

Status at the end of the game: coronel-io

Damage output file: coronel-results

Plot of ship movements: coronel-plot

The Battle with Canopus

The fight between the pre-dreadnought battleship Canopus and the armored cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau. Both armored cruisers ran out of 21 cm shells and the Canopus was finished off with the 15 cm secondary batteries. Torpedoes may have been a better choice. If this encounter had occurred historically, low ammunition after the Coronel battle would probably have caused von Spee to avoid Canopus.

Status at the end of the game: canopus-io

Damage output file: canopus-output

Plot of ship movements: canopus-plot

The Battle of Coronel including HMS Defence

A battle between Cradock’s squadron, reinforced by the armored cruiser Defence, and von Spee’s squadron. This is a lot closer fight than the actual battle. With Scharnhorst sunk and Gneisenau out of 21 cm shells, von Spee’s squadron would probably break up into individual raiders.

Status at the end of the game: defence-io

Damage output file: defence-output

Plot of ship movements: defence-plot

The Battle of the Falklands

The historical battle between Sturdee’s battlecruisers and von Spee’s armored cruisers. The battlecruisers took more damage than in the actual battle, possibly because von Spee’s armored cruisers did not try to run.

Status at the end of the game: falklands-io

Damage output file: falklands-output

Plot of ship movements: falklands-plot

The Battle of Stanley

A hypothetical battle between Sturdee’s  squadron and von Spee’s squadron, assuming that von Spee attacks before Sturdee is underway. The scenario in the book started with the Gneisenau and the Nurnberg approaching Stanley and the rest of von Spee’s squadron 15 nautical miles away. To give von Spee more of a chance, this exercise assumes that he approached with his squadron together. Timings for Sturdee’s ships getting underway are from Corbett, not from Owen’s book.

Status at the end of the game: stanley-io

Damage output file: stanley-output

Plot of ship movements: stanley-plot (the outlines of Stanley harbor and Port William are not shown on the plot, but were used for the game)

Initial positions showing coastlines: stanley-coastlines

Updated plot with shorelines: stanley-plot-shorelines